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TemporaryFreeware

Page history last edited by PBworks 14 years, 7 months ago

.

 

Top Ten Tips for spotting "temporary Freeware"

 

1

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 2:00 am

From: Susan Bugher

 

ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10

 

Susan


 

2

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 5:55 am

From: Saxman

 

On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 01:00:17 -0500, Susan Bugher wrote:

> ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

> things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

> What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

> 1.

> 2.

> 3.

> 4.

> 5.

> 6.

> 7.

> 8.

> 9.

> 10.

 

> Susan

 

1. Buy now?

2. Registration Screen on 'Start-Up'.

3. No 'Help'files.


 

3

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 6:24 am

From: AvaL...@Sig.UK ( Steve H)

 

On Wed, 8 Feb 2006 09:55:26 +0000 (UTC), Saxman

 

wrote:

>On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 01:00:17 -0500, Susan Bugher wrote:

 

>> ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

>> things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

>> What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

>> 1.

>> 2.

>> 3.

>> 4.

>> 5.

>> 6.

>> 7.

>> 8.

>> 9.

>> 10.

 

>> Susan

 

>1. Buy now?

>2. Registration Screen on 'Start-Up'.

>3. No 'Help'files.

 

4. It's a beta version, and all other apps on the site are shareware.

5. The Paypal banner takes up half the header on the page.

 

Regards,


 

4

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 9:57 am

From: Anonymous"

 

>> 1. Buy now?

>> 2. Registration Screen on 'Start-Up'.

>> 3. No 'Help'files.

 

> 4. It's a beta version, and all other apps on the site are shareware.

> 5. The Paypal banner takes up half the header on the page.

 

6. Favored freeware that does one thing very well and then quickly

evolves WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

 

Let me explain in a hypothetical scenario (that is really not quite so

hypothetical...):

 

A software author writes several small utilities that perform unique

and individual tasks very well. The author posts each utility as

freeware and people start downloading and using all of them. The users

favor one of the products well enough to talk about it, recommend it,

and write about it on newsgroups. The favored product starts appearing

on review-sites and on other Freeware Download sites as well. The

author focuses all attention on that one program. The author solicits

suggestions from the users even if those suggestions go WAY beyond the

original scope of the freeware utility. Those suggestions are written

into the program very quickly, as if the author has nothing else to do

all day but write user's suggestions into the freeware and debug code.

The other freeware utilities are either ignored by the author,

disappear without warning or become incorporated into the program that

the users are favoring.

 

Version 1.0 of this favored program will be for sale by the

Entrepreneur who has been using investor's money to pay the rent and

buy food during this "development" phase of a product that people will

want to buy because it does everything that the users want it to do.

 

The first publicly overt clue of this scenario is the favored freeware

that does one thing very well and then quickly evolves WAY beyond the

scope of its original design.


 

5

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 4:40 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Anonymous wrote:

> 6. Favored freeware that does one thing very well and then quickly

> evolves WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

> Let me explain in a hypothetical scenario (that is really not quite so

> hypothetical...):

 

> A software author writes several small utilities that perform unique and

> individual tasks very well. The author posts each utility as freeware

> and people start downloading and using all of them. The users favor one

> of the products well enough to talk about it, recommend it, and write

> about it on newsgroups. The favored product starts appearing on

> review-sites and on other Freeware Download sites as well. The author

> focuses all attention on that one program. The author solicits

> suggestions from the users even if those suggestions go WAY beyond the

> original scope of the freeware utility. Those suggestions are written

> into the program very quickly, as if the author has nothing else to do

> all day but write user's suggestions into the freeware and debug code.

> The other freeware utilities are either ignored by the author, disappear

> without warning or become incorporated into the program that the users

> are favoring.

 

> Version 1.0 of this favored program will be for sale by the Entrepreneur

> who has been using investor's money to pay the rent and buy food during

> this "development" phase of a product that people will want to buy

> because it does everything that the users want it to do.

 

> The first publicly overt clue of this scenario is the favored freeware

> that does one thing very well and then quickly evolves WAY beyond the

> scope of its original design.

 

Authors write Freeware programs for a number of reasons. Some want the

apps to contribute to their bottom line - either as "loss leaders" or by

their eventual transformation into Shareware apps. Nothing in the world

wrong with that.

 

OTOH I'm looking at this from the Freeware *user's* perspective.

 

ACF participant's interest is in finding good free programs. It's

discouraging to discover that an app you'd like to try (now that you

have a need for it) has become Shareware. If you'd known that was

likely to happen you might have downloaded it while it was still free -

or perhaps you did download the app and like it but when you look for an

update you discover it's now Shareware and you don't have the last

freeware version. I think it makes sense to look for the signs that tell

us to get it *NOW* while it's still free.

 

also. . .

 

Some apps make the transition from Freeware to Shareware rather rapidly.

Some authors clearly have a plan. . . I'd like to avoid cluttering up

the ACF program info list with programs that look "promising" if they

are going to become Shareware as soon as they're truly usable. . .

 

Susan


 

6

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 8:29 pm

From: SeaMaiden"

 

Susan Bugher" wrote in message

 

news:44v300F45uqeU1@individual.net...

 

> ACF participant's interest is in finding good free programs. It's

> discouraging to discover that an app you'd like to try (now that you have

> a need for it) has become Shareware. If you'd known that was likely to

> happen you might have downloaded it while it was still free - or perhaps

> you did download the app and like it but when you look for an update you

> discover it's now Shareware and you don't have the last freeware version.

> I think it makes sense to look for the signs that tell us to get it *NOW*

> while it's still free.

 

> Susan

 

I agree.


 

7

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 2:27 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Steve H wrote:

> On Wed, 8 Feb 2006 09:55:26 +0000 (UTC), Saxman

> wrote:

 

>>On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 01:00:17 -0500, Susan Bugher wrote:

 

>>>ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

>>>things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

>>>What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

>>1. Buy now?

>>2. Registration Screen on 'Start-Up'.

>>3. No 'Help'files.

> 4. It's a beta version, and all other apps on the site are shareware.

> 5. The Paypal banner takes up half the header on the page.

 

6. (copied from another post) Favored freeware that does one thing very

well and then quickly evolves WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

 

7. It's a professional looking site. There's only one app on the web

site. let's call it app "XYZ". The author is "XYZ Software". The web

site is www.XYZ.com

 

8. It's a professional looking site but there's no information about the

company/author(s).


 

8

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 2:50 pm

From: Saxman

 

On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 13:27:53 -0500, Susan Bugher wrote:

> 6. (copied from another post) Favored freeware that does one thing very

> well and then quickly evolves WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

 

> 7. It's a professional looking site. There's only one app on the web

> site. let's call it app "XYZ". The author is "XYZ Software". The web

> site is www.XYZ.com

 

> 8. It's a professional looking site but there's no information about the

> company/author(s).

 

9. The splash screen says "You have 30 free days remaining before you need

to upgrade the software".


 

9

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 3:18 pm

From: miskairal

 

Saxman wrote:

> On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 13:27:53 -0500, Susan Bugher wrote:

 

>>6. (copied from another post) Favored freeware that does one thing very

>>well and then quickly evolves WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

 

>>7. It's a professional looking site. There's only one app on the web

>>site. let's call it app "XYZ". The author is "XYZ Software". The web

>>site is www.XYZ.com

 

>>8. It's a professional looking site but there's no information about the

>>company/author(s).

 

> 9. The splash screen says "You have 30 free days remaining before you need

> to upgrade the software".

 

10. Free to download


 

10

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 3:36 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

miskairal wrote:

> 10. Free to download

 

Yup. That's an indicator - especially if using that phrase means they

won't have to change the web page when the app goes Shareware.

 

Susan


 

11

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 8:13 pm

From: EDEB"

 

Susan Bugher" wrote in message news:44uv85F453t8U1@individual.net...

> miskairal wrote:

 

> > 10. Free to download

 

Especially at numerous commercial looking mirrors...

 

;O)

 

EDEB.


 

12

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 3:29 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Saxman wrote:

> On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 13:27:53 -0500, Susan Bugher wrote:

> 9. The splash screen says "You have 30 free days remaining before you need

> to upgrade the software".

 

Isn't that Trialware? Instead, how about:

 

9. The app is keyed registerware => total control of distribution => no

*usable* last freeware versions can be downloaded once the switch is

made. . . I think that a *really* good indicator.


 

13

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 4:12 pm

From: SeaMaiden"

 

Susan Bugher" wrote in message

 

news:44tfedF3rttnU1@individual.net...

 

> ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

> things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

> What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

> Susan

 

You can decide which of these should be in the top 10.

 

1. Buy now?

2. Registration Screen on 'Start-Up'.

3. No 'Help'files.

4. It's a beta version, and all other apps on the site are shareware.

5. The PayPal banner takes up half the header on the page.

6. Favored freeware that does one thing very well and then quickly evolves

WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

7. It's a professional-looking site. There's only one app on the web site.

Let's call it app "XYZ". The author is "XYZ Software". The web site is

www.XYZ.com.

8. It's a professional looking site, but there's no information about the

company/author(s).

9. The splash screen says "You have 30 free days remaining before you need

to upgrade the software" or "this version expires on mm/dd/yy". (RegCool and

Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware, but their versions expire after a

time, so you have to download new ones. They are not shareware or trialware,

just freeware that expires, or expireware.)

10. The app is keyed registerware => total control of distribution => no

*usable* last freeware versions can be downloaded once the switch is made. .

. I think that a *really* good indicator.

11. The web site says "This version is free for a limited time". It may be

expireware, or if no expiration is built-into the program, the author may

only be making it available as freeware for, say, 1 month. Then he will

start charging for it, and you won't be able to download it again unless you

buy the program or pay for a premium membership.

12. Free to download.

13. Free to try.

14. Free for personal or noncommercial use.

15. Addons, Upgrades, and/or Technical Support are only available to

registered users.

16. Each new free version has fewer and fewer features, and one day they

decide to do away with the free version completely (Everest Home Edition).

17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to see in

the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to a web

page or email address where you can submit your comments.


 

14

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 4:28 pm

From: SeaMaiden"

 

SeaMaiden" wrote in message

 

news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

 

> "Susan Bugher" wrote in message

> news:44tfedF3rttnU1@individual.net...

>> ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

>> things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

>> What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

>> Susan

 

> You can decide which of these should be in the top 10.

 

> 1. Buy now?

> 2. Registration Screen on 'Start-Up'.

> 3. No 'Help'files.

> 4. It's a beta version, and all other apps on the site are shareware.

> 5. The PayPal banner takes up half the header on the page.

> 6. Favored freeware that does one thing very well and then quickly evolves

> WAY beyond the scope of its original design.

> 7. It's a professional-looking site. There's only one app on the web site.

> Let's call it app "XYZ". The author is "XYZ Software". The web site is

> www.XYZ.com.

> 8. It's a professional looking site, but there's no information about the

> company/author(s).

> 9. The splash screen says "You have 30 free days remaining before you need

> to upgrade the software" or "this version expires on mm/dd/yy". (RegCool

> and Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware, but their versions expire

> after a time, so you have to download new ones. They are not shareware or

> trialware, just freeware that expires, or expireware.)

> 10. The app is keyed registerware => total control of distribution => no

> *usable* last freeware versions can be downloaded once the switch is made.

> . . I think that a *really* good indicator.

> 11. The web site says "This version is free for a limited time". It may be

> expireware, or if no expiration is built-into the program, the author may

> only be making it available as freeware for, say, 1 month. Then he will

> start charging for it, and you won't be able to download it again unless

> you buy the program or pay for a premium membership.

> 12. Free to download.

> 13. Free to try.

> 14. Free for personal or noncommercial use.

> 15. Addons, Upgrades, and/or Technical Support are only available to

> registered users.

> 16. Each new free version has fewer and fewer features, and one day they

> decide to do away with the free version completely (Everest Home Edition).

> 17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to see

> in the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to a

> web page or email address where you can submit your comments.

 

18. Nag screens that pop up from time to time to tell you that there are

more features in the registered, pro, or deluxe version and ask if you'd

like to upgrade.

19. Nag screens that pop up when you click on an option that is not

available in the free version (X-Cleaner Free, xplorer2 Lite) and ask if

you'd like to upgrade to the registered, pro or deluxe version.


 

15

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 5:09 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

SeaMaiden wrote:

> "SeaMaiden" wrote in message

> news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

>>You can decide which of these should be in the top 10.

 

Top 100 tips is fine too. ;)

 

>>9. The splash screen says "You have 30 free days remaining before you need

>>to upgrade the software" or "this version expires on mm/dd/yy". (RegCool

>>and Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware, but their versions expire

>>after a time, so you have to download new ones. They are not shareware or

>>trialware, just freeware that expires, or expireware.)

 

*NOT* Freeware to begin with: "Freeware: Legally obtainable software

that you may use at no cost, monetary or otherwise, for as long as you

wish."

 

>>11. The web site says "This version is free for a limited time". It may be

>>expireware, or if no expiration is built-into the program, the author may

>>only be making it available as freeware for, say, 1 month. Then he will

>>start charging for it, and you won't be able to download it again unless

>>you buy the program or pay for a premium membership.

 

This version is free for a limited time" is rather MORE than an

indicator - temporary for sure - no need for us to guess if the author

spells it out. (ISTM statements like that are almost always included in

ACF posts.)

 

>>14. Free for personal or noncommercial use.

 

I have to disagree with this one - lots of "long term" freeware is only

free for personal use.

 

Susan


 

16

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 7:21 am

From: Harvey Van Sickle

 

On 08 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote

 

> SeaMaiden wrote:

 

snip

 

>>> 14. Free for personal or noncommercial use.

> I have to disagree with this one - lots of "long term"

> freeware is only free for personal use.

 

Glad you picked up that one. I agree: IMO that's not been an

indicator of a likely change to share/payware.


 

17

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 5:15 pm

From: Steven Burn"

 

SeaMaiden" wrote in message

 

news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

 

> 17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to see

in

> the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to a web

> page or email address where you can submit your comments.

 

Err I'm confused by this one ..... would people prefer we *not* ask what

they would like to see added? (if thats the case then #18 may aswell be "Has

a feedback/suggestions/bug report menu option to allow sending the author

feedback on the program")


 

18

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 5:37 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Steven Burn wrote:

> "SeaMaiden" wrote in message

> news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

 

>>17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to see

> in

>>the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to a web

>>page or email address where you can submit your comments.

> Err I'm confused by this one ..... would people prefer we *not* ask what

> they would like to see added? (if thats the case then #18 may aswell be "Has

> a feedback/suggestions/bug report menu option to allow sending the author

> feedback on the program")

 

If anything, I'd say 17 is a contra-indicator. Apps with no version

info, no feedback mechanism, nothing but a page with a blurb and a

download button - IMO those are more likely to be the apps that change

quickly to Shareware.

 

Susan


 

19

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 6:00 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Susan Bugher wrote:

> Steven Burn wrote:

 

>> "SeaMaiden" wrote in message

>> news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

 

>>> 17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to see

 

>> in

 

>>> the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to

>>> a web

>>> page or email address where you can submit your comments.

 

>> Err I'm confused by this one ..... would people prefer we *not* ask what

>> they would like to see added? (if thats the case then #18 may aswell

>> be "Has

>> a feedback/suggestions/bug report menu option to allow sending the author

>> feedback on the program")

 

> If anything, I'd say 17 is a contra-indicator. Apps with no version

> info, no feedback mechanism, nothing but a page with a blurb and a

> download button - IMO those are more likely to be the apps that change

> quickly to Shareware.

 

for example:

http://www.scosoft.com/

 

Susan


 

20

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 6:37 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Susan Bugher wrote:

> Susan Bugher wrote:

>> Steven Burn wrote:

>>> "SeaMaiden" wrote in message

>>> news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

>>>> 17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to

>>>> see

>>> in

>>>> the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to

>>>> a web

>>>> page or email address where you can submit your comments.

>>> Err I'm confused by this one ..... would people prefer we *not* ask what

>>> they would like to see added? (if thats the case then #18 may aswell

>>> be "Has

>>> a feedback/suggestions/bug report menu option to allow sending the

>>> author

>>> feedback on the program")

>> If anything, I'd say 17 is a contra-indicator. Apps with no version

>> info, no feedback mechanism, nothing but a page with a blurb and a

>> download button - IMO those are more likely to be the apps that change

>> quickly to Shareware.

 

> for example:

> http://www.scosoft.com/

 

Another example of a site that where I think the free apps will go $ware

in the not too distant future:

http://www.ice-graphics.com/

 

What say the rest of you? Agree/disagree?

 

Susan


 

21

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 8:32 pm

From: SeaMaiden"

 

Steven Burn" wrote in message

 

news:43ea5f48$0$1458$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net...

 

> "SeaMaiden" wrote in message

> news:LgsGf.11311$tb3.5717@newssvr24.news.prodigy.net...

>> 17. The web site clearly states "What new features would you like to see

> in

>> the next version of XYZ program?", and there is a link underneath to a

>> web

>> page or email address where you can submit your comments.

 

> Err I'm confused by this one ..... would people prefer we *not* ask what

> they would like to see added? (if thats the case then #18 may aswell be

> "Has

> a feedback/suggestions/bug report menu option to allow sending the author

> feedback on the program")

 

> Steven Burn

> Ur I.T. Mate Group

> www.it-mate.co.uk

 

I mentioned that for the case where the author is actively soliciting

comments to create a "favored" program that's no longer free. It goes with

#6 - Favored freeware that does one thing very well and then quickly evolves

WAY beyond the scope of its original design. That was the intent here. Sorry

for any confusion.


 

22

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 5:30 pm

From: Vegard Krog Petersen

 

on 08.02.2006 21:12 SeaMaiden wrote:

 

> 9. ...RegCool and

> Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware, but their versions expire after a

> time, so you have to download new ones. They are not shareware or trialware,

> just freeware that expires, or expireware.)

 

Good term, we should perhaps use that as a new term to describe some

fringe 'freeware'programs.


 

23

Date: Wed, Feb 8 2006 6:29 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Vegard Krog Petersen wrote:

> on 08.02.2006 21:12 SeaMaiden wrote:

 

>> 9. ...RegCool and Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware, but their

>> versions expire after a time, so you have to download new ones. They

>> are not shareware or trialware, just freeware that expires, or

>> expireware.)

> Good term, we should perhaps use that as a new term to describe some

> fringe 'freeware'programs.

 

I've been struggling with a way to say that in as few words as possible.

. . one example of what I've started putting in ware descriptions:

 

Ware: (Donationware) (Registerware: time limited/renewable) (free)

 

Has anybody got a better suggestion?

 

Susan


 

24

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 7:36 am

From: Harvey Van Sickle

 

On 08 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote

 

> Vegard Krog Petersen wrote:

>> on 08.02.2006 21:12 SeaMaiden wrote:

 

>>> 9. ...RegCool and Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware,

>>> but their versions expire after a time, so you have to

>>> download new ones. They are not shareware or trialware, just

>>> freeware that expires, or expireware.)

>> Good term, we should perhaps use that as a new term to

>> describe some fringe 'freeware'programs.

> I've been struggling with a way to say that in as few words as

> possible. . . one example of what I've started putting in

> ware descriptions:

 

> Ware: (Donationware) (Registerware: time limited/renewable)

> (free)

> Has anybody got a better suggestion?

 

Can't help with a description, but FWIW I now steer clear of the

expiring/renewable stuff.

 

I can see the rationale of the developer not wanting a bunch of

older versions kicking around, but I find it annoying to come to

rely on something that stops you using an older version, but

demands additional resources, etc. to run the new one.

 

(A recent case was with the Brava pdf reader: the old version

expired and was shut down, but the new free version only operates

on XP. I can imagine other apps that start demanding that you

install the NET framework, or run ActiveX, or something.)

 

The mileage of others may vary, but that's why I wouldn't

personally recommend "expire-and-renew" freeware.


 

25

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 5:45 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

> On 08 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote

>>I've been struggling with a way to say that in as few words as

>>possible. . . one example of what I've started putting in

>>ware descriptions:

 

>>Ware: (Donationware) (Registerware: time limited/renewable)

>>(free)

>>Has anybody got a better suggestion?

> Can't help with a description, but FWIW I now steer clear of the

> expiring/renewable stuff.

 

> I can see the rationale of the developer not wanting a bunch of

> older versions kicking around, but I find it annoying to come to

> rely on something that stops you using an older version, but

> demands additional resources, etc. to run the new one.

 

> (A recent case was with the Brava pdf reader: the old version

> expired and was shut down, but the new free version only operates

> on XP. I can imagine other apps that start demanding that you

> install the NET framework, or run ActiveX, or something.)

 

> The mileage of others may vary, but that's why I wouldn't

> personally recommend "expire-and-renew" freeware.

 

IMO there's one type of app that's a "special case". Apps that by their

nature *need* frequent updating/renewing (anti-spyware etc.) will be

worthless anyway if the author stops supporting/updating them. ISTM the

distinction between permanent and "expire-and-renew" is not particulary

meaningful for those apps.

 

Thanks for the heads-up about Brava.

 

Susan


 

26

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 4:37 am

From: Harvey Van Sickle

 

On 09 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote

 

> Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

 

re: expiry/renewal

 

snip

 

>> I find it annoying to come to rely on something that stops

>> you using an older version, but demands additional resources,

>> etc. to run the new one.

 

>> (A recent case was with the Brava pdf reader: the old

>> version expired and was shut down, but the new free version

>> only operates on XP. I can imagine other apps that start

>> demanding that you install the NET framework, or run ActiveX,

>> or something.)

 

>> The mileage of others may vary, but that's why I wouldn't

>> personally recommend "expire-and-renew" freeware.

 

> IMO there's one type of app that's a "special case". Apps that

> by their nature *need* frequent updating/renewing

> (anti-spyware etc.) will be worthless anyway if the author

> stops supporting/updating them. ISTM the distinction between

> permanent and "expire-and-renew" is not particulary meaningful

> for those apps.

 

I see your point; that wouldn't bother me, but as you say it's a

special-case thing.

 

> Thanks for the heads-up about Brava.

 

It was annoying. I've switched to Foxit, though, and will stick

with them.

 

(Corporately, of course, that's the danger with the "expiry" model.

When I *do* (inevitably) change to XP -- and especially if I want

to purchase a "pro" version or a corporate-type pdf maker, which

I'm pulling towards -- I'll stick with the companies I'm using

rather than go back to one that pulled the rug out on me.)


 

27

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 11:39 am

From: Susan Bugher

 

Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

> On 09 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote

>>Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

>>IMO there's one type of app that's a "special case". Apps that

>>by their nature *need* frequent updating/renewing

>>(anti-spyware etc.) will be worthless anyway if the author

>>stops supporting/updating them. ISTM the distinction between

>>permanent and "expire-and-renew" is not particulary meaningful

>>for those apps.

 

> I see your point; that wouldn't bother me, but as you say it's a

> special-case thing.

 

>>Thanks for the heads-up about Brava.

 

> It was annoying. I've switched to Foxit, though, and will stick

> with them.

 

> (Corporately, of course, that's the danger with the "expiry" model.

> When I *do* (inevitably) change to XP -- and especially if I want

> to purchase a "pro" version or a corporate-type pdf maker, which

> I'm pulling towards -- I'll stick with the companies I'm using

> rather than go back to one that pulled the rug out on me.)

 

Yup - if the idea is to draw in future customers they're shooting

themselves in the foot as far as I'm concerned. IMO the expire/renew

model is *usually* an indication that they INTEND to pull the rug out

from under me. My reaction -> thanks but no thanks, I'm not interested

in Trialware and I don't trust people/companies that play games.

 

Susan


 

28

Date: Tues, Feb 14 2006 5:35 am

From: JeremyDestined"

 

Susan Bugher wrote:

> Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

> > On 09 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote

> > > Harvey Van Sickle wrote:

 

> > > IMO there's one type of app that's a "special case". Apps that

> > > by their nature need frequent updating/renewing

> > > (anti-spyware etc.) will be worthless anyway if the author

> > > stops supporting/updating them. ISTM the distinction between

> > > permanent and "expire-and-renew" is not particulary meaningful

> > > for those apps.

 

> > I see your point; that wouldn't bother me, but as you say it's a

> > special-case thing.

 

> > > Thanks for the heads-up about Brava.

 

> > It was annoying. I've switched to Foxit, though, and will stick

> > with them.

 

> > (Corporately, of course, that's the danger with the "expiry" model.

> > When I do (inevitably) change to XP -- and especially if I want to

> > purchase a "pro" version or a corporate-type pdf maker, which I'm

> > pulling towards -- I'll stick with the companies I'm using rather

> > than go back to one that pulled the rug out on me.)

 

> Yup - if the idea is to draw in future customers they're shooting

> themselves in the foot as far as I'm concerned. IMO the expire/renew

> model is usually an indication that they INTEND to pull the rug out

> from under me. My reaction -> thanks but no thanks, I'm not

> interested in Trialware and I don't trust people/companies that play

> games.

 

> Susan

 

I'd prefer the term "Trowel-ware.." instead of trial-ware.. :-) That

way we are describing a way for the program to dig itself its own grave.

 

Jeremy


 

29

Date: Tues, Feb 14 2006 3:43 pm

From: B. Otsing"

 

On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 23:29:12 +0100, Susan Bugher

wrote:

 

> I've been struggling with a way to say that in as few words as possible.

> . . one example of what I've started putting in ware descriptions:

 

> Ware: (Donationware) (Registerware: time limited/renewable) (free)

 

resuscitationware?


 

30

Date: Tues, Feb 14 2006 4:27 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

B. Otsing wrote:

> On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 23:29:12 +0100, Susan Bugher

> wrote:

 

>> I've been struggling with a way to say that in as few words as

>> possible. . . one example of what I've started putting in ware

>> descriptions:

 

>> Ware: (Donationware) (Registerware: time limited/renewable) (free)

> resuscitationware?

 

:) It's a thought. . .

 

So far "renewable" seems like the best all-purpose warning notation.

 

Some apps are time-limited - newer versions can be downloaded or the app

can be re-registered (Mouser's apps eventually become Freeware). . .

some apps are not time-limited but are keyed - a new key is required if

the app has to be re-installed or your email address changes or. . . in

that case if the company goes the app eventually goes with it - there's

no longer a way to re-install it. . .

 

IOW - "renewable" means there's some kind of gottcha lurking that has to

 

do with whether you can use the app "for as long as you wish".

 

http://www.pricelesswarehome.org/acf/WareGlossary.php

 

Freeware: Legally obtainable software that you may use at no cost,

monetary or otherwise, for as long as you wish."

 

Susan


 

31

Date: Sun, Feb 19 2006 7:09 am

From: Franklin

 

On 14 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote:

 

>> resuscitationware?

 

> :) It's a thought. . .

 

> So far "renewable" seems like the best all-purpose warning

> notation.

 

> Some apps are time-limited - newer versions can be downloaded or

> the app can be re-registered (Mouser's apps eventually become

> Freeware). . . some apps are not time-limited but are keyed - a

> new key is required if the app has to be re-installed or your

> email address changes or. . . in that case if the company goes

> the app eventually goes with it - there's no longer a way to

> re-install it. . .

 

Expiryware" maybe?

 

> IOW - "renewable" means there's some kind of gottcha lurking

> that has to do with whether you can use the app "for as long as

> you wish".

 

> http://www.pricelesswarehome.org/acf/WareGlossary.php

 

> "Freeware: Legally obtainable software that you may use at no

> cost, monetary or otherwise, for as long as you wish."


 

32

Date: Sun, Feb 19 2006 4:11 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Franklin wrote:

> On 14 Feb 2006, Susan Bugher wrote:

>>So far "renewable" seems like the best all-purpose warning

>>notation.

 

>>Some apps are time-limited - newer versions can be downloaded or

>>the app can be re-registered (Mouser's apps eventually become

>>Freeware). . . some apps are not time-limited but are keyed - a

>>new key is required if the app has to be re-installed or your

>>email address changes or. . . in that case if the company goes

>>the app eventually goes with it - there's no longer a way to

>>re-install it. . .

> "Expiryware" maybe?

 

IMO Resuscitationware would be more apt. ;) "Expiryware" sounds like

Trialware => death with no hope of redemption.

 

>>IOW - "renewable" means there's some kind of gottcha lurking

>>that has to do with whether you can use the app "for as long as

>>you wish".

 

>>http://www.pricelesswarehome.org/acf/WareGlossary.php

 

>>"Freeware: Legally obtainable software that you may use at no

>>cost, monetary or otherwise, for as long as you wish."

 

Susan


 

33

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 9:55 am

From: Dewey Edwards

 

On Wed, 08 Feb 2006 22:30:32 +0100, Vegard Krog Petersen

 

wrote:

>on 08.02.2006 21:12 SeaMaiden wrote:

>> 9. ...RegCool and

>> Microsoft Antispyware are both freeware, but their versions expire after a

>> time, so you have to download new ones. They are not shareware or trialware,

>> just freeware that expires, or expireware.)

 

>Good term, we should perhaps use that as a new term to describe some

>fringe 'freeware'programs.

 

In June,M$ will want $49.95 per year for their suite of protection

tools, including the current antispyware beta.

 

http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Microsoft-Sets-Pricing-on-OneCare-...


 

34

Date: Sat, Feb 11 2006 9:42 am

From: SeaMaiden"

 

> In June,M$ will want $49.95 per year for their suite of protection

> tools, including the current antispyware beta.

 

> http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Microsoft-Sets-Pricing-on-OneCare-...

 

That's for Microsoft OneCare, a suite that includes antivirus, antispyware,

and other stuff. I don't need that. I use NOD32 antivirus and Spy Sweeper.

Will the stand-alone Microsoft Antispyware program still be free?


 

35

Date: Sat, Feb 11 2006 10:04 am

From: Intermagic"

 

> Will the stand-alone Microsoft Antispyware program still be free?

 

It seems so.


 

36

Date: Tues, Feb 14 2006 5:36 am

From: JeremyDestined"

 

SeaMaiden wrote:

 

> > In June,M$ will want $49.95 per year for their suite of protection

> > tools, including the current antispyware beta.

 

> > http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Microsoft-Sets-Pricing-on-OneCare

> > -Live/story.xhtml?story_id=0200028E0GGO

 

> That's for Microsoft OneCare, a suite that includes antivirus,

> antispyware, and other stuff. I don't need that. I use NOD32

> antivirus and Spy Sweeper. Will the stand-alone Microsoft Antispyware

> program still be free?

 

Is nod32 not free-ware?

 

Jeremy supercommodoreatmaildotcom


 

37

Date: Fri, Feb 24 2006 12:09 pm

From: Dewey Edwards

 

On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 13:42:40 GMT, "SeaMaiden"

 

wrote:

 

>> In June,M$ will want $49.95 per year for their suite of protection

>> tools, including the current antispyware beta.

 

>> http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Microsoft-Sets-Pricing-on-OneCare-...

 

>That's for Microsoft OneCare, a suite that includes antivirus, antispyware,

>and other stuff. I don't need that. I use NOD32 antivirus and Spy Sweeper.

>Will the stand-alone Microsoft Antispyware program still be free?

 

MS has released a page that suggests so

 

http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/spyware/software/about/produ...

 

From Langa list were I found this

 

Microsoft also has laid out its larger plans for Windows Defender and

several related products, such as "Live Safety Center," One Care

Live," and so on, at: http://tinyurl.com/ahfh4 . Interestingly, two of

the five listed services appear to be heading towards fee-based

operation. But Windows Defender, Windows Live Safety Center and the

Malicious Software Removal Tool will remain free; a good thing."


 

38

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 5:27 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Chris Lee wrote:

> In article <44tfedF3rtt...@individual.net>, sebug...@yahoo.com says...

>>ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

>>things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for

>>long.

 

>>What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

> 1. If it's Windows/Mac Software and it's hyped through a "review"

> on sites like ZDNet or Betanews.com

 

Gotta agree with that. And conversely - if an app isn't listed on any

major software sites that's a pretty good indication the author is not

using it as a "loss leader".

 

Susan


 

39

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 9:54 pm

From: Sietse Fliege"

 

Susan Bugher wrote:

> Chris Lee wrote:

>> In article <44tfedF3rtt...@individual.net>, sebug...@yahoo.com

>> says...

 

>>> ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

>>> things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for

>>> long.

 

>>> What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

>> 1. If it's Windows/Mac Software and it's hyped through a "review"

>> on sites like ZDNet or Betanews.com

 

> Gotta agree with that.

 

Not to challenge this, but this a a good moment to point to ZDNet's

George Ou's nice review of µTorrent http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p 3

 

Turns out that a program can be hyped simultaneously by both you, Susan

and by ZDNet's George Ou. :)

 

> And conversely - if an app isn't listed on any major software sites

> that's a pretty good indication the author is not using it as a

> "loss leader".

 

There's major software sites and major freeware sites.

I guess that if an app is listed on major *freeware sites only* that is

a pretty good indication that it's gonna stay freeware.

I really don't know if there is many freeware that is to be found on

major freeware sites only, though.

Of the major software sites I only frequently visit Softpedia, but then

I use the bookmark http://win.softpedia.com/index1.free.shtml which

shows me only freeware.

I get the impression that it does not miss much of what can be found on

e.g. http://www.freewarefiles.com/search.php?optionmostrecent

 

On a side note: John Corliss frequently advises to only visit major

freeware sites, particularly ones that try out every program to check

out if it does not contain nasties and is really freeware.

While that is good advice from a security point of view, I am glad that

many acf participants also check out programs that are not listed on any

major software/freeware site. There has been found many a jewel from

authors that do not submit their freeware to any major site.

And they certainly tend to stay freeware :)


 

40

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 11:54 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

Sietse Fliege wrote:

> Susan Bugher wrote:

>>Chris Lee wrote:

>>>In article <44tfedF3rtt...@individual.net>, sebug...@yahoo.com

>>>says...

>>>>ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

>>>>things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for

>>>>long.

 

>>>>What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

>>>1. If it's Windows/Mac Software and it's hyped through a "review"

>>>on sites like ZDNet or Betanews.com

 

>>Gotta agree with that.

> Not to challenge this, but this a a good moment to point to ZDNet's

> George Ou's nice review of µTorrent http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p 3

 

*Very* nice review. :)

 

> Turns out that a program can be hyped simultaneously by both you, Susan

> and by ZDNet's George Ou. :)

 

I looked at µTorrent because ACF participants told me it was a good app.

*They* nominated and selected it for PL2006. I'm no expert - *most*

especially when it comes to bit torrents - but having tried it I'm

certainly a fan and I do hype it. The nomination surprised me because I

couldn't remember a previous mention of the app. Now I know why - it was

brand new.

 

Credit goes to Soren for spotting this gem almost instantly - check the

date of his post:

 

Subject: Re: PL PL2006 Program Submittals - uTorrent

 

From: Soren Hedeby Sorensen

Date: Sat, 08 Oct 2005 10:08:51 +0200

 

>>And conversely - if an app isn't listed on any major software sites

>>that's a pretty good indication the author is not using it as a

>>"loss leader".

> There's major software sites and major freeware sites.

> I guess that if an app is listed on major *freeware sites only* that is

> a pretty good indication that it's gonna stay freeware.

> I really don't know if there is many freeware that is to be found on

> major freeware sites only, though.

> Of the major software sites I only frequently visit Softpedia, but then

> I use the bookmark http://win.softpedia.com/index1.free.shtml which

> shows me only freeware.

> I get the impression that it does not miss much of what can be found on

> e.g. http://www.freewarefiles.com/search.php?optionmostrecent

 

I think the indications are bad if an app turns up on a *lot* of

software sites when it's first introduced. If somebody's marketing an

app there's likely a good reason. The authors of "temporary" Freeware

intend to get a return on their investment. ISTM *only* the authors of

temporary" Freeware apps are likely to invest considerable time, energy

and money in order to introduce that app to a large audience.

 

I see this when I'm searching for last freeware versions and finding the

app on *lots* of sites. That often includes many sites that still say

it's Freeware but are now *unknowingly* linking to the newer Shareware

download. . .

 

> On a side note: John Corliss frequently advises to only visit major

> freeware sites, particularly ones that try out every program to check

> out if it does not contain nasties and is really freeware.

 

grumble. . . that misbegotten piece of Malware called Taskman that I

posted about today is available at Tucows. . .

 

> While that is good advice from a security point of view, I am glad that

> many acf participants also check out programs that are not listed on any

> major software/freeware site. There has been found many a jewel from

> authors that do not submit their freeware to any major site.

> And they certainly tend to stay freeware :)

 

Yup - on the whole those apps do stay free. :)

 

Susan


 

41

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 8:20 pm

From: canetoad

 

Susan Bugher wrote:

> ISTM that after you've looked at a lot of web sites you realize some

> things are pretty good indicators that an app won't stay free for long.

 

> What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

> 1. They use a pretend picture of gaudy boxed software on website.


 

42

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 8:30 pm

From: EDEB"

 

 

> > What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

> > 1. They use a pretend picture of gaudy boxed software on website.

 

The company also sells boxed software, in real or digital boxes.

 

EDEB.


 

43

Date: Thurs, Feb 9 2006 9:28 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

EDEB wrote:

>>>What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

>>> 1. They use a pretend picture of gaudy boxed software on website.

> The company also sells boxed software, in real or digital boxes.

 

I dunno. Take a look at the box shots on these NCH Swift Sound web pages:

 

http://nch.com.au/switch/ (Liteware)

http://nch.com.au/switch/plus.html (Shareware)

 

http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/ (liteware)

http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/masters.html (Shareware)

 

They might pull all their Liteware apps tomorrow but IMO that doesn't

seem very likely.

 

Susan


 

44

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 8:02 am

From: EDEB"

 

> >>>What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

> >>> 1. They use a pretend picture of gaudy boxed software on website.

 

> > The company also sells boxed software, in real or digital boxes.

 

> I dunno. Take a look at the box shots on these NCH Swift Sound web pages:

 

> http://nch.com.au/switch/ (Liteware)

> http://nch.com.au/switch/plus.html (Shareware)

 

> http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/ (liteware)

> http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/masters.html (Shareware)

 

> They might pull all their Liteware apps tomorrow but IMO that doesn't

> seem very likely.

 

Fair enough. I'm sure you'll be able to find lots of exceptions, but I've noticed that revocation of freeware status *sometimes*

follows, just on the basis that it's a commercial operation, and they want to make money...

 

EDEB.


 

45

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 12:12 pm

From: Susan Bugher

 

EDEB wrote:

>>>>>What are the *best* ways to spot "temporary Freeware" apps?

 

>>>>>1. They use a pretend picture of gaudy boxed software on website.

 

>>>The company also sells boxed software, in real or digital boxes.

 

>>I dunno. Take a look at the box shots on these NCH Swift Sound web pages:

 

>>http://nch.com.au/switch/ (Liteware)

>>http://nch.com.au/switch/plus.html (Shareware)

 

>>http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/ (liteware)

>>http://www.nch.com.au/wavepad/masters.html (Shareware)

 

>>They might pull all their Liteware apps tomorrow but IMO that doesn't

>>seem very likely.

 

> Fair enough. I'm sure you'll be able to find lots of exceptions, but I've noticed that revocation of freeware status *sometimes*

> follows, just on the basis that it's a commercial operation, and they want to make money...

 

Yup - the way commercial authors present their Freeware programs does

offer some pretty good clues as to their intentions. I'm not convinced

that the presence of a box shot "in and of itself" is a good clue - ISTM

there are other clues that are better indicators. There are some pretty

good counter-indicators too - a separate section for Freeware apps is

one. . .

 

Susan


 

46

Date: Fri, Feb 10 2006 5:20 pm

From: EDEB"

 

> > Fair enough. I'm sure you'll be able to find lots of exceptions, but I've noticed that revocation of freeware status

*sometimes*

> > follows, just on the basis that it's a commercial operation, and they want to make money...

 

> Yup - the way commercial authors present their Freeware programs does

> offer some pretty good clues as to their intentions. I'm not convinced

> that the presence of a box shot "in and of itself" is a good clue - ISTM

> there are other clues that are better indicators. There are some pretty

> good counter-indicators too - a separate section for Freeware apps is

> one. . .

 

> Susan

> --

 

Fairynuff.

 

EDEB.


 

 

 

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